Dead Parents Dungeon

All posts tagged Dead Parents Dungeon

(Most) Every Thursday, I make a brief development blog on my card/board game, Dead Parents Dungeon (DPD). It’s a fantasy-themed, light-hearted game about families and dungeons.

Current Progress: Set Skeleton (cont)

A set skeleton is a list of the cards being made and listed by function. The set skeleton for DPD needs certain themes to be present. It doesn’t mean that I need to nail down every card right now, just as long as I have enough cards to do the things I need to do. It’s just another part of trying to get the most out of playtesting before I have to completely rebuild every card after the first playtest.

This week it’s Rumor and Twist! cards, the adversarial cards. The Twist!s I had were flavorful, they didn’t do the work I needed them to do. They need to push cards and weed out parents. I mean, ideally parents would die in the dungeons, but I’m flexible on this point.

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(Most) Every Thursday, I make a brief development blog on my card/board game, Dead Parents Dungeon (DPD). It’s a fantasy-themed, light-hearted game about families and dungeons.

Current Progress: Set Skeleton (cont)

A set skeleton is a list of the cards being made and listed by function. The set skeleton for DPD needs certain themes to be present. It doesn’t mean that I need to nail down every card right now, just as long as I have enough cards to do the things I need to do. It’s just another part of trying to get the most out of playtesting before I have to completely rebuild every card after the first playtest.

This week it’s Heirlooms and Retirement cards, the places where you want to go and what you use to get there. While Heirlooms can still be played to improve other Heirlooms, I haven’t really delineated the abilities of the “prime” heirloom from what the “upgrade” heirlooms add. I’m currently leaning towards just lending a die bonus from upgrades.

That means abilities are either good early and late-game or they can be shuffled and replaced. Given the use of “draining” as a dungeon consequence which (basically) taps down cards and prevents them from being used until the dungeon is complete, it makes sense that upgrades can be used to protect the function of a main Heirloom. I can still have some equipment give a lesser bonus when they’re used as upgrades.

Still though, it feels like abilities stronger than the ones listed here should be used.

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(Most) Every Thursday, I make a brief development blog on my card/board game, Dead Parents Dungeon (DPD). It’s a fantasy-themed, light-hearted game about families and dungeons.

Current Progress: Set Skeleton

A set skeleton is a list of the cards being made and listed by function. The Magic: the Gathering guys are probably the best-known users of set skeletons. Of course, they’ve got a lot more factors to balance–creature size, spell cost, draft viability, ratio of sorceries to permanents, etc.–but the basic idea is the same.

The set skeleton for DPD needs certain themes to be present. It doesn’t mean that I need to nail down every card right now, just as long as I have enough cards to do the things I need to do. It’s considered penciled in and because I’ve never made a Magic set (despite making several individual cards), I don’t really know how the numbers balance out. It’s just another part of trying to get the most out of playtesting before I have to burn every part of the playtest for the first revision.

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(Most) Every Thursday, I make a brief development blog on my card/board game, Dead Parents Dungeon (DPD). It’s a fantasy-themed, light-hearted game about families and dungeons.

Current Progress:

Just want to get this done with. After literal years of kicking this idea around I want it done. Current status is “It will be good to finish because I’ll learn something for next time.”

At least I hope is that and not “This is gonna take some work.”

I’m actually in the part where I don’t want to make draft cards again because I already made draft cards and I hate, hate, <i><b>hate</b></i> repeating work. On the other hand, it was me who said I’d prototype everything then revise. On that first hand, I was unaware that “revise” in this context meant “repeat work.”

Se la vie.

(Most) Every Thursday, I make a brief development blog on my card/board game, Dead Parents Dungeon (DPD). It’s a fantasy-themed, light-hearted game about families and dungeons.

Current Progress: Uuuuuuuuugh

IDK. Like there’s a tableau of three village cards, but you can also dig two cards deep for a specific card as a village action. If your dig doesn’t get the one you want you can spend a monster head to dig an extra card. Retirement cards can improve these numbers to represent the services retired, experienced PCs can bring to a town.

All PCs have relationship arrows, and at least one has to connect a PC to a family. Your theytriarch might have two side arrows (brother/sister/partner) and an up arrow (parent), but they can still have a baby provided either: that baby’s PC card has an up arrow or that theytriarch has a partner who has a down arrow (child). When you marry someone you immediately roll for babies. At the start of each turn, babies age into adults, then ALL couples roll for babies.

PC cards have a die and one ability. Hopefully, I’ll be able to keep the fighters like equipment, wizards use monster-head-as-spell-components, and thieves avoid suffering consequences themes. Because PCs now only add a single die and an ability to a dungeon, the motivation for taking multiple PCs into a dungeon (beyond double-dipping loot) is synergy between simple abilities. Equipment/heirlooms now do most of the heavy dice-piling.

Twist cards are gonna work parents and siblings hard (in a grave-ward direction) to push each family towards having only one heir per generation. Cousins might as well bathe in Smaug’s Best (TM) Ketchup. Fuck cousins. ALL GAME BALANCING WILL HENCEFORTH BE DONE ON TWIST CARDS, A CARD TYPE I HAVE NEVER EVEN PROTOTYPED.

Each family starts with a piece of equipment that doubles as a “family card.” Or maybe every piece of equipment has a “Family Ability” and the other equipment just give die bonuses. No, that’s boring. The “heirloom equipment” is the first one you play. It hangs out on top. All other equipment give a die bonus and an ability, but once you upgrade the heirloom with a new equipment, you lose the ability of the last non-heirloom equipment and only keep the die bonus. No more “village abilities,” just monster type bonuses, re-rolls, etc.

Monsters are going to kill, drain equipment cards, and probably force some draws of Twist cards (or activation of Twist cards in the tableau). Why not? Maybe they’ll have different colors so they’ll feel different.

Retirement cards previously had two costs (I don’t know why). They should definitely have only one.

There used to be only five Rumors, meaning the game was only five dungeons/turns long OR that it had several non-dungeon turns. Rumors are now less special and more plentiful.

Next Time: No bets guys.

Every Thursday, I make a brief development blog on my card/board game, Dead Parents Dungeon (DPD). It’s a fantasy-themed, light-hearted game about families and dungeons.

Current Progress: Rebooting

What is best in life? To see your family grow proud before you. To hear the lamentations of monsters. To retire responsibly to that little castle on the beach you always talked about.

Dead Parents Dungeon is a game where players take on the role of adventuring families who seek the money and fame which can only be found by defeating dangerous monsters in the many frightening dungeons of the world. Players manage marriages, children, and heirlooms between the life-threatening forays into the world’s darkest corners. The first player to put aside enough monster heads to earn a total of 10 retirement points has the most successful family and is the winner!

The new take on Dead Parents Dungeon keeps the dice. It keeps gear (now Heirlooms). It keeps Adventurers and Monsters, but dispenses with the class leveling and minion mechanics. It gets rid of the scars and silver currency and converts monsters directly into monster heads.

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Every Thursday, I make a brief development blog on my card/board game, Dead Parents Dungeon (DPD). It’s a fantasy-themed, light-hearted game about families and dungeons.

Current Progress: meh

I cook. I don’t make food for humans. I make piles of tasteless nutrients which only I can bear to eat (I’m affectionately called ‘The Jade Goat’ from time to time). By the end of the pile, even I have a hard time stomaching it.

I hate repeating work, and rejiggering everything in DPD is repeated work. I can barely stomach it.

Everything someone makes to present to other people has to reach a balance between “personally satisfying” and “appealing to an audience.” The part where DPD is appealing to an audience–simple, straightforward, fast–is sapping me of the personally satisfying elements that got me to do it in the first place. It’s where I usually stumble on projects.

English is an exceptional language in that it captures all of this in the phrase, “hard work.” It won’t be impressive progress for a while, but it’ll be progress.

Every Thursday, I make a brief development blog on my card/board game, Dead Parents Dungeon (DPD). It’s a fantasy-themed, light-hearted game about families and dungeons.

Current Progress: I’m still working on Relics. An Adventurer has one relic and all other relics are played as upgrades. The “base” ability of a relic is usually a village ability that’s intended for use outside of dungeons. The “upgrade” abilities are dungeon-focused and remove a ceiling for power within a dungeon.

But I’m running into the problem where this pre-alpha version of Dead Parents Dungeon is “meh” on Dead, failing on Parents, and overcommitted on Dungeons. That means that there isn’t a lot of village play for me to work with on the Relics.

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Every Thursday, I make a brief development blog on my card/board game, Dead Parents Dungeon (DPD). It’s a fantasy-themed, light-hearted game about families and dungeons.

Current Progress: I’ve been going over the flavor for the Relics/Destinies. The idea is that in the previous generic-fantasy-age, there was a tree which grew things along fate lines, intricate, multi-functional devices which existed in N-th dimensions. The end of the age saw the tree picked clean (or devastated or eaten by aphids. Whatever). The relics remain, with N-th dimensional features that Adventurers unlock as they learn to master their equipment.

Or via three easy payments of 1 Scars & Silver.

I’m supposed to be picking up the types discussion from last week, but let me make an aside on Scars & Silver.

Card Types, Part 2 (and Scars & Silver)

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