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Derek’s 80/40/40 joke was really good and I missed it. I’m not sure what else there is to say here.

Was there another way to slip some elements of TOS into the series? I feel like this series quickly forgets the lessons of this episode later, but it is a good one.

The Beige and The Bold is available on iTunes, Stitcher, and other podcasting platforms. It updates Sunday nights at 12:00 PM ET / 11:00 PM CT.

*Many years ago, Norphalia*

Lila: Bria, honey, I think it’s adorable that you’ve given our servants the night off so you can serve my parents yourself, but…

Bria: Look, I’m undead now and I still love you. We’ll make this work.

Lila, *kisses her*: Please get the plates. There are thirteen members of my immediate family and we’ll need three plates each, plus a bowl and a silverware set. Plus two for us.

Bria: I’ll be right back.

Lila: Just–just remember be careful about what you say to my mother tonight; you know she’s sensitive about her weight.

Bria: Of course.

*Bria enters the kitchen and sees a towering pile of dishes*

Bria: So…three for every thirteen and…um…wait.

The Most Toys

I fell off of making these and need to get back onto it, but even when I did make them more regularly, I never shared them here.

I think I scaled this one down too much for the amount of ‘growth’ I added for the white border. It’s a process.

I just got through watching season one of The Good Place on Neflix. There were enough .gifs and video clips on the internet that I knew the general beats, but even knowing most of the twists, I was really impressed with this show.

It’s a network sitcom. It’s got all of the characteristics of a network sitcom: bright colors, characters who kind of like each other and kinda don’t, and Ted Danson.

The premise is that our main characters–Elanor, Chidi, Tahani, and Jianyu are dead. They and 318 other dead people go to a personalized neighborhood in The Good Place to enjoy eternal happiness.

The kink in that plan–at least initially–is that Elanor doesn’t belong in The Good Place. A clerical error gave her the points (karma, basically) of another person. And if she’s found out, she goes to The Bad Place.

Elanor isn’t evil; she’s just a bad person who’s embrace an life aggressive immorality and selfishness. When disasters that reflect Elanor’s shitty behavior beset the neighborhood, Elanor has to learn to become a good person before the neighborhood’s all-powerful architect, Michael, can connect her to the disasters.

In true sitcom style, the ring of conspirators in Elanor’s misplaced status widens and the situations get wilder, but the tension never releases: the season’s penultimate moment is an emotional roulette wheel of characters arguing over trips to The Bad Place to save each other.

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This is another one of Season 3’s signature solid episodes. I think it’s a bit underrated by the fan base, honestly. Maybe because the stylistic choices are so bold it gets cringey for some folks. Honestly, this thing gets high marks for me for conflict, villain, universe building, continuity, and characterization. It tells us so many things about all of the working parts in it that the worst criticism I can give it is that it’s not longer.

The auction house I was thinking of was Christie’s. I don’t feel bad for blanking; I mean, who uses Christie’s when eBay exists?

Before every episode, Derek and I warm up a bit and do some planning–that’s where I get the SoundCloud teasers from. Part of the discussion for this episode was about serialized series versus episodic series. This is a smart, self-contained episode that would lose a lot of momentum if these Data/Fajo scenes only happened once per episode over three or four episodes or if we filled those same episodes with failed escape attempts. On the other hand, the concept of Data’s death is big enough that we should see its effects on the Enterprise.

I dunno, it seems like TNG and DS9 balanced the serialized/episodic divide much, much better than Voyager and (or so I’ve heard) Discovery. This is a good episode to demonstrate that, right?

“Sarek” trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5h_-bG5Mvkc

The Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/vanvelding

The Beige and The Bold is available on iTunes, Stitcher, and other podcasting platforms. It updates Sunday nights at 12:00 PM ET / 11:00 PM CT.

Gahncai: So do humans do anything?

Bria: Hey!

Gahncai: The living ones. Are they useful?

Ularon: They can’t breathe underwater or swim well.

Rulah: Well…

Bria: I don’t miss shitting or sweating.

Rulah: Y’know–

Ularon: Sweating. When Rulah first told me about that, I thought she was making it up.

Rulah: Humans can do math, assholes.

Bria, Rulah, Ularon: …

Ularon: Damn.

Gahncai: Weird.

Bria: I miss math. 🙁

This show is kinda smug, but it’s alright.

Like, there’s a strong presumption in society that the people the police arrest are guilty and that defending them is something unsavory or perfunctory. It’s weird and shitty, but funding public defenders requires accepting the systemic failure or malice of a major pillar of order in our society so I guess we don’t because it’s unpleasant to think about and cheaper to let poor people go to jail.

My main complaint with Barclay is that he’s overrated. But that only comes because he’s vulnerable in a way that no main character could be. My main complaint isn’t with the fandom, but with the cultural limitations of the 1990’s. I guess that’s a recurring theme.

“Look behind you,” stretches back at least to Cu Chulainn, the mythical hero of Ireland. It’s an old, old trick.

It’s really frustrating to see the main cast be so bad at basic leadership. It’s not just about them, but about the setting and the philosophy behind it. What could they have changed to keep this episode essentially intact but to still functional?

The Beige and The Bold is available on iTunes, Stitcher, and other podcasting platforms. It updates Sunday nights at 12:00 PM ET / 11:00 PM CT.